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Hormone Information “Some states do very little for women’s health, while some do a barely adequate job, according to a state-by-state analysis from the National Women’s Law Center and Oregon Health & Science University.”
 
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Women’s Health: State Rankings

By Daniel DeNoon, WebMD
Medical News Reviewed by Michael Smith, MD, on Friday, May 07, 2004

Original article

May 7, 2004 – An American woman’s health may hang on where she lives.

Some states do very little for women’s health, while some do a barely adequate job, according to a state-by-state analysis from the National Women’s Law Center and Oregon Health & Science University.

“The outlook for women’s health is grim and nowhere near approaching the nation’s goals for 2010 set by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services,” Michelle Berlin, MD, MPH, of OHSU says in a news release. “Failing to meet these goals undermines not only the health and well-being of women, but the well-being of our country as well.”

The rankings are based on whether states have adopted 67 “key women’s health policies.” The only one of these met by all the states is Medicaid coverage for breast and cervical cancer. Only three states – New York, California, and Rhode Island – met more than half of these policy goals. Idaho, South Dakota, and Mississippi met the fewest.

State-by-State Rankings on Women’s Health Here are the state-by-state rankings, in rank order:

  1. Minnesota
  2. Massachusetts
  3. Vermont
  4. Connecticut
  5. New Hampshire
  6. Hawaii
  7. Colorado
  8. Utah
  9. Maine
  10. Washington
  11. Rhode Island
  12. Arizona
  13. Iowa
  14. North Dakota
  15. Maryland
  16. Oregon
  17. Montana
  18. New Jersey
  19. Nebraska
  20. California
  21. Florida
  22. Kansas
  23. Wisconsin
  24. Delaware
  25. Alaska
  26. Virginia
  27. South Dakota
  28. Wyoming
  29. New York
  30. Idaho
  31. Pennsylvania
  32. Michigan
  33. Nevada
  34. Georgia
  35. Missouri
  36. Ohio
  37. New Mexico
  38. North Carolina
  39. Illinois
  40. South Carolina
  41. Indiana
  42. Tennessee
  43. Kentucky
  44. District of Columbia
  45. Alabama
  46. Texas
  47. Oklahoma
  48. West Virginia
  49. Arkansas
  50. Louisiana
  51. Mississippi

Major components of the rankings are based on:

  • Access to health insurance. Nationwide, 18% of women are uninsured. This ranges from 8% in Minnesota to a whopping 28% (more than one in four women) in Texas.
  • Requiring insurance to pay for tests such as mammograms, pap smears, and colorectal cancer screening.
  • Access to reproductive services such as contraception, emergency contraception, and abortion.
  • Economic security issues such as minimum wage, paid family leave, and child support.

“F” grades on the groups’ national report card goes to six states: Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, West Virginia, Oklahoma, and Texas.

“Satisfactory minus” grades – meaning not quite satisfactory but not unsatisfactory – go to eight states: Minnesota, Massachusetts, Vermont, Connecticut, New Hampshire, Hawaii, Colorado, and Utah.

All other states get an “unsatisfactory” rating.

The report shows that while many states made gains in some areas, they offset these gains by weakening women’s health in other areas.

SOURCES: Making the Grade on Women’s Health: A National and State-by-State Report Card, National Women’s Law Center and Oregon Health & Science University, 2004. News release, National Women’s Law Center.

© 2004 WebMD Inc. All rights reserved.

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